Manila education – APASL 2019 Manila http://apasl2019manila.org/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 08:50:22 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://apasl2019manila.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.jpg Manila education – APASL 2019 Manila http://apasl2019manila.org/ 32 32 Quick look back at Duterte’s 6 years – Manila Bulletin https://apasl2019manila.org/quick-look-back-at-dutertes-6-years-manila-bulletin/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 08:17:00 +0000 https://apasl2019manila.org/quick-look-back-at-dutertes-6-years-manila-bulletin/ A comfortable life for all. President Duterte (photo Malacañang) It’s what President Duterte pledged to give to every Filipino when he was sworn in as the country’s 16th president in 2016. His presidency was focused on ending illegal drugs, crime and poverty. corruption in three to six months. Six years after making that promise, let’s […]]]>

A comfortable life for all.

President Duterte (photo Malacañang)

It’s what President Duterte pledged to give to every Filipino when he was sworn in as the country’s 16th president in 2016. His presidency was focused on ending illegal drugs, crime and poverty. corruption in three to six months.

Six years after making that promise, let’s look at how he managed to keep that promise.

According to Executive Secretary Salvador Medialdea, President Duterte’s legacy “will not only be spoken of in years to come, but will also be felt by generations to come.”

Medialdea also touted administration achievements such as infrastructure, accessible health care, free college education, free irrigation, government service reforms, and the near eradication of insurgency and violence. communist extremism.

war on drugs

As of March 31, 2022, its infamous war on drugs has led to the dismantling of 1,130 drug dens and clandestine laboratories, the clearing of 24,766 of 42,045 barangays and the arrest of 14,888 high-value targets, including 527 government employees.

The administration’s anti-drug campaign has seized 76.17 billion pesos worth of shabu and rescued 4,307 minors between the ages of 4 and 17 from illegal drug trafficking. Meanwhile, 6,241 people have been killed in the 233,356 anti-illegal drug operations carried out from July 1, 2016 to March 31, 2022.

Build, Build, Build

One of the Duterte administration’s flagship programs is the Build, Build, Build infrastructure program, which aims to increase the productive capacity of the economy, create jobs, raise incomes and strengthen the climate. of investment leading to sustained and inclusive growth.

Binondo Bridge – Intramuros (Photo courtesy of DPWH)

As of December 2021, a total of 233 airport projects and 484 seaport projects have been completed. There are now 1,200 kilometers of railways in the country, including expansion projects and the ongoing construction of the country’s first metro system.

A total of 34,291 kilometers of roads have been completed as of December 2021 and 5,950 bridges have been completed as of May 2021. The program has seen improved mobility of Metro Manila’s main thoroughfare. In particular, the EDSA Busway has reduced the travel time between Pasay and Monumento from two to three hours to just 40 to 50 minutes.

Important laws

The Duterte administration saw the passage of some important laws, including:

  • Tax Reform for Acceleration and Inclusion Act (TRAIN)
  • Business Recovery and Business Tax Incentives Act (CREATE)
  • Bureau of Fire Protection (BFP) Modernization Act
  • The controversial anti-terrorism law
  • Bangsamoro Organic Law, which created Bangsamoro Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (BARMM)
  • Free Tertiary Education Act, which gave 2.46 million students access to free university education for the 2021-2022 academic year
  • Universal Health Care Act
  • Philippines Identification System Act (PhilSys)
  • Maternity leave law extended to 105 days
  • Telecommuting Act, which allowed employees to work away from their workplace
  • Law on universally accessible, cheaper and quality medicines, which reduced the price of medicines for the most serious diseases by up to 93%

Security, Justice, Peace

President Duterte increased the salaries of military and uniformed personnel and strengthened the country’s defense by adding 24 new military assets, including frigates, air support, planes and helicopters.

File photo of President Duterte inspecting the decommissioned firearms of former Moro Islamic Liberation Front fighters during their decommissioning at the compound of the former provincial capitol in Sultan Kudarat, Maguindanao on September 7, 2019. (Photo by Malacanang)

Despite his rocky relationship with the Communist Party of the Philippines (CPP), Duterte’s programs to reach out to the rebels have resulted in the surrender of 23,097 people to the government as of December 31, 2021.

According to the Inter-Ministerial Mechanism for Normalization (ICCMN), 19,345 Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF) fighters have been downgraded and processed for general admission under Phases 1-3 of the normalization program in the Bangsamoro. This is a staggering increase from the benchmark of 145 fighters decommissioned in 2016.

The country’s crime rate has dropped by 73.76% over the past five years. Interior Secretary Eduardo Año said last month that index crimes in the Philippines fell to 34,552 in 2021 from 131,699 in 2016.

One of the events that rocked Duterte’s administration was the five-month-long war against Islamic State-inspired terrorists that left the city of Marawi in ruins in 2017. Since the end of the war in October 2017 , the government has been working to return the war-torn city to its former glory. About 72% of rehabilitation projects and recovery efforts were completed in May.

Housing Secretary Eduardo del Rosario, who heads the government-led Task Force Bangon Marawi (TFBM), said 56 agencies had completed 164 projects worth 17 billion pesos. Meanwhile, another 35 rehabilitation and recovery projects worth 3.92 billion pesos are underway.

Participatory governance

President Duterte sought to extend the validity of the Philippine passport to 10 years and the driver’s license to five years.

Meanwhile, the Duterte administration’s Freedom of Information (FOI) program received 105,302 requests from 553 government agencies in March 2022.

The president’s campaign against corruption in government led to the sacking of 200 civil servants. He also created the Presidential Anti-Corruption Commission and the Anti-Bureaucracy Authority, which reduced easy dealings with the government to just three days.

On top of that, the Duterte administration has seen the rehabilitation of Boracay, where 83% of establishments are now compliant with the 12-meter road easement rule, and 81% are compliant with the 25+5 beach easement limit. meters from June 2021. .

Economic development

Under Duterte, 75 billion pesos of Coco Levy funds accrued to coconut farmers, while an annual fund of 10 billion pesos is allocated to more than 674,000 rice farmers. As of March 2021, some 834,000 hectares of paddy fields nationwide are now producing more rice, while 1,033,778 farmers have benefited from the free irrigation law since December 15, 2021.

Duterte saw the implementation of tax reform programs, including the TRAIN law, which allowed the government to raise 305 billion pesos in additional revenue in the first three years of implementation. According to the Presidential Communications Operations Office (PCOO), 99% of employees no longer pay income tax under the TRAIN Act.

The CREATE Act reduced corporate tax for micro, small and medium-sized enterprises (MSMEs) and other businesses from 30% to 20%. It has also provided tax relief worth 1 trillion pesos over the next 10 years.

A total of 9.64 billion pesos in loans under the P3 loan program have been granted to 238,737 micro and small enterprises since 2017.

Recently, President Duterte signed the amendments to the Civil Service Law and the Foreign Investment Law to boost economic recovery from the Covid-19 pandemic.

Human development and poverty reduction

With the free higher education program, 1,623,642 students received free tuition from 2020 to 2021. There were also 2,012,618 Alternate Learning System (ALS) graduates from 2017 to 2020. There will be 10.582 million of Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA) graduates from 2016 to 2021.

There were 11,531 active “Free Wi-Fi for All” sites nationwide as of December 15, 2021.

Recently, the President signed into law Republic Act No. 11650, which establishes Inclusive Learning Centers in all school districts to provide learners with disabilities with accessible and appropriate public education and related services based on their needs to develop their full potential as autonomous participants. members of society.

A total of 109,035,343 Filipinos were immediately eligible for universal health care, while 258 billion pesos were disbursed. About 3.3 million Filipinos have been helped by Malasakit centers.

Meanwhile, more than 643.2 billion pesos have been disbursed to 4.26 million beneficiaries of the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino (4Ps) program from 2016 to November 2021. In 2018, the National Economic Development Authority (NEDA) has said 6 million Filipinos had been lifted out of poverty. A total of 1,030,886 housing units for the poor were delivered from July 2016 to November 2021.

Pandemic response

To deal with the Covid-19 pandemic, President Duterte passed the Bayanihan To Heal As One Act and the Bayanihan To Recover As One Act. It is the largest social protection program in the country’s history.

President Duterte meets with key members of the Inter-Agency Task Force (IATF) for the Management of Emerging Infectious Diseases on April 11, 2022. (Malacañang Photo)

By August 2021, around 9,000 temporary treatment and monitoring facilities had been built, while there were 813 Covid-19 facilities built as of December 6, 2021.

The number of public health workers in the country increased by 10.2% to 60,142 between 2016 and 2020.

To help workers affected by the pandemic, some 7.588 million displaced workers have been assisted by the Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE). A total of 911,867 Overseas Filipino Workers (OFWs) affected by the pandemic have been repatriated as of February 1, 2022. Some 6.833 million OFWs have also been assisted through the OFW One-Stop Service Center in November 2021.

In March this year, Malacañang issued an executive order on the ten-point program on economic recovery from Covid-19, aimed at keeping the country more resilient under the new normal. The ten-point program retains the existing alert level system while easing restrictions on domestic and international travel, public transport capacity and allowing face-to-face classes, among other things.

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Is abortion a human right? More likely a human evil https://apasl2019manila.org/is-abortion-a-human-right-more-likely-a-human-evil/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 15:00:12 +0000 https://apasl2019manila.org/is-abortion-a-human-right-more-likely-a-human-evil/ This file photo from June 24, 2022 shows anti-abortion activists celebrating outside the United States Supreme Court in Washington, DC after it overturned the Roe v. Wade of 1973 which protected the right to abortion. AFP PHOTO first word I ask the question because of the anguish and anger with which many American women received […]]]>

This file photo from June 24, 2022 shows anti-abortion activists celebrating outside the United States Supreme Court in Washington, DC after it overturned the Roe v. Wade of 1973 which protected the right to abortion. AFP PHOTO

first word

I ask the question because of the anguish and anger with which many American women received the decision of the Supreme Court of the United States to overturn its famous Roe v Wade decision on the constitutionality of abortion there half a century ago. America seems to split in two in its consequences.

It was British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher who raised the intriguing notion that just as there are human rights, there are also human wrongs. She noted that at one point half of America worshiped slavery as their right, and even went to war because of it.

The UN does not dare to declare it

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The UN did not dare go so far as to make abortion a human right and include it in the historic declaration.

She played with the idea that “access to abortion is a human right”. Human Rights Watch, an international non-governmental organization allied with the UN, has been very diligent in promoting access to abortion as a human right.

HRW says of its position online:

Access to safe and legal abortion is a human rights issue. Authoritative interpretations of international human rights law establish that denying pregnant women, girls and other people access to abortion is a form of discrimination and jeopardizes a range of human rights. . United Nations human rights treaty bodies regularly call on governments to decriminalize abortion in all cases and to guarantee access to safe and legal abortion in at least certain circumstances.

Countries have an obligation to respect, protect and fulfill human rights, including those relating to sexual and reproductive health and autonomy. When safe and legal abortion services are unreasonably limited or not fully available, many other internationally protected human rights may be threatened, including the rights to non-discrimination and equality; life, health and information; free from torture and cruelty; inhuman and degrading treatment; privacy and bodily autonomy and integrity; decide on the number and spacing of children; to freedom; enjoy the benefits of scientific progress; and freedom of conscience and religion.

These rights are set out in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and protected by numerous international treaties, including the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, the Convention against Torture , the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women and the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Human Rights Watch (HRW) believes that reproductive rights are human rights, including the right to access abortion. States have an obligation to provide pregnant women, girls and other people with access to safe and legal abortion as part of their basic human rights responsibilities.

As HRW has stated in amicus curiae briefs to high courts in countries around the world – from Brazil and Colombia to South Korea and more recently with partner organizations in the United States – international human rights law human rights and relevant case law support the conclusion that decisions about abortion rest with a pregnant person alone, without unreasonable interference or restriction from the state or third parties.

Is the right to life in danger when access to abortion is restricted or prohibited?

Yes. Legal restrictions on abortion often lead to more illegal abortions, which can also be unsafe and lead to higher maternal mortality and morbidity. Therefore, the lack of access to safe and legal abortion puts the lives of pregnant women at risk.

Even where abortion is technically legal, heavy restrictions can make it inaccessible to marginalized people. This forces pregnant women, especially those from marginalized groups, to seek out opportunities for clandestine and unsafe abortions and risk criminal or civil penalties, even when their situation falls within what is legally permitted.

What has the UN said about the lack of access to abortion and its criminalization?

United Nations human rights treaty bodies, which monitor countries’ compliance with relevant treaties and report or advise on human rights related to specific themes or countries, have consistently called for the decriminalization of abortion and the full realization of sexual and reproductive rights, including access to safe, legal abortion.

Setbacks on hard-won rights

At 88, Gloria Steinem has long been America’s most visible feminist and women’s rights advocate. But at 22, she was a scared American in London who illegally aborted a pregnancy so unwanted she actually tried to throw herself down the stairs to end it.

Her response to the Supreme Court’s decision overturning Roe v. Wade is succinct: “Obviously,” she wrote in an email, “without the right of women and men to make decisions about their own bodies, there is no democracy”.

Steinem’s blunt remark goes to the heart of the desperation some opponents feel over Friday’s historic rollback of the 1973 case legalizing abortion. If a right so central to the global fight for women’s equality can be revoked, they ask, what does this mean for the progress women have made in public life over the 50 years since followed ?

“One of the things I keep hearing from women is, ‘My daughter is going to have less rights than me. And how can that be?’ “says Debbie Walsh, of the Center for American Women and Politics at Rutgers University. “If it works, what else can go? It makes everything precarious.”

Women who fought for these rights remember a decade of astonishing progress from around 1963 to 1973, including the right to equal pay, the right to use birth control, and Title 9 in 1972 that banned discrimination in education. To top it off, Roe versus Wade a year later, granting a constitutional right to abortion.

Many women who identified as feminists at the time had illegal abortions or knew someone who had. In fact, Steinem credits a “speaking out” meeting she attended on abortion in her 30s with when she transitioned from journalism to activism — and finally felt empowered to speak out about her. own secret abortion.

“Abortion is so intertwined with the women’s movement in this country,” says Carole Joffe, a sociologist at the University of California San Francisco School of Medicine who studies and teaches the history of abortion. “With improved birth control, what legal abortion meant was that working heterosexual women could still participate in public life. It enabled the huge change we’ve seen in the status of women over the past 50 years.”

Of course, not all women believe that abortion is a right worth preserving.

Linda Sloan, who for the past five years has volunteered with the anti-abortion organization A Moment of Hope in Columbia, South Carolina, with her husband, says she values ​​women’s rights.

But when it comes to Roe versus Wade, she says, “I believe the rights of the child in the womb are equally important. To quote Psalm 139, I believe that God ‘formed my inner parts’ and ‘knitted me together in my mother’s womb.'”

A human evil

How will the Dobbs decision impact the Philippines?

In his column here yesterday, Law and Religion Scholar Fr. Rannie Aquino had this to say:

“Dobbs will not end abortions in the United States. It left states the ability to enact laws authorizing, restricting, ending or penalizing abortion. the feet of the most rabid proponents of abortion. There is already a lot of talk about ways around the bans that abortion-disadvantaged states can legislate to put in place.

It is our good fortune in the Philippines that Section 12, Article 2 of our Constitution obligates the state to protect “the life of the mother and the life of the unborn child from conception”. I am of the opinion that this policy of the state is in fact an enforceable provision of the Constitution because when it obliges the state to protect the life of the unborn child from conception, no law of enactment or execution does not need to be adopted. Rather, the provision stands as a barrier against any legislative or regulatory action that would have the effect of threatening the life of the unborn child.”

Filipinos will most likely declare abortion to be a human evil.

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Duterte and Briones meet | The Manila Times https://apasl2019manila.org/duterte-and-briones-meet-the-manila-times/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 15:11:15 +0000 https://apasl2019manila.org/duterte-and-briones-meet-the-manila-times/ DUTERTE, BRIONES MEET Vice President-Elect Sara Duterte-Carpio meets with Education Secretary Leonor Briones on Saturday, June 25, 2022 to discuss the transition to the Department of Education. Duterte will succeed Briones as education chief. PHOTO FROM SARA DUTERTE-CARPIO’S FACEBOOK PAGE (UPDATED) Vice President-elect Sara Duterte-Carpio met with Education Secretary Leonor Briones on Saturday to discuss […]]]>

DUTERTE, BRIONES MEET Vice President-Elect Sara Duterte-Carpio meets with Education Secretary Leonor Briones on Saturday, June 25, 2022 to discuss the transition to the Department of Education. Duterte will succeed Briones as education chief. PHOTO FROM SARA DUTERTE-CARPIO’S FACEBOOK PAGE

(UPDATED) Vice President-elect Sara Duterte-Carpio met with Education Secretary Leonor Briones on Saturday to discuss the transition to the Department of Education, which she will lead from July.

Duterte-Carpio and Briones held a one-on-one meeting at the DepEd office in Pasig before proceeding with the transition briefing with other DepEd officials.

Briones, in a statement sent by DepEd, provided an overview of the Department’s work under the outgoing administration, including a summary of its scope of responsibility, its contribution to basic education reforms and the identification of issues requiring immediate policy attention, such as back-to-school guidelines.

Duterte-Carpio acknowledged the contribution of the current DepEd team to the programs of her father, President Rodrigo Duterte, while thanking Briones for her statement of support after being identified by President-elect Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos, Jr. head the agency.

Among other topics discussed, the orientations for the start of the 2022-2023 school year and the department’s budget for 2023, which will be the subject of consultations between the members of the two teams.

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The outgoing DepEd administration will also hand over the work of the National Consultations Convening Committee for the United Nations Education Transformation Summit to be held during the United Nations General Assembly in September.

Briones and Duterte also agreed to hold a joint farewell and welcome ceremony on July 4.

The outgoing leader has also agreed to work with the incoming DepEd administration as a consultant.

Briones had been appointed director of the Regional Center for Educational Innovation and Technology of the Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization (Seameo Innotech) effective August 1.

Duterte-Carpio had affirmed his support for the resumption of face-to-face classes in the country.


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Family and friends remember ‘simple and decent’ Noynoy Aquino who served without fanfare https://apasl2019manila.org/family-and-friends-remember-simple-and-decent-noynoy-aquino-who-served-without-fanfare/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 07:44:27 +0000 https://apasl2019manila.org/family-and-friends-remember-simple-and-decent-noynoy-aquino-who-served-without-fanfare/ MANILA, Philippines – Family, friends and allies of the late former President Benigno “Noynoy” Aquino III gathered at a solemn Mass to mark the first year since his passing, remembering the legacy of good governance he left behind. Those closest to Aquino began arriving at the Church of the Gesú at the Ateneo de Manila […]]]>

MANILA, Philippines – Family, friends and allies of the late former President Benigno “Noynoy” Aquino III gathered at a solemn Mass to mark the first year since his passing, remembering the legacy of good governance he left behind.

Those closest to Aquino began arriving at the Church of the Gesú at the Ateneo de Manila University early Friday morning, June 24. It was also the same place where Aquino supporters gathered for three days after his death from kidney disease secondary to diabetes. one year ago.

Aquino was a “true blue” Atenean, having completed his primary, secondary, and college education at the Blue School along Katipunan Avenue.

Just outside the church gates, longtime Aquino staff Yolly Yebres helped run a stall where caps and balloons bearing Aquino’s face and name were made available. guests for free.

Yebres and two of Aquino’s security aides were the ones who discovered his lifeless body in his bedroom at his home in Quezon City a year ago. He died peacefully in his sleep at the age of 61.

Among those present at the mass were Aquino’s sisters Ballsy, Pinky, Miel and their respective families. His famous sister Kris Aquino is currently in the United States undergoing treatment for her ultra-rare disease EGPA. Key opposition figures such as incumbent Vice President Leni Robredo, Senate Minority Leader Franklin Drilon, Senator Kiko Pangilinan and former Interior Secretary Mar Roxas were among those present at the rally.

There was not much discussion of politics during the service, only a quiet tribute to the values ​​and principles Aquino represented when he was the most powerful man in the Philippines: accountability, transparency and his refusing to weigh in just because he was the president.

In his homily, Jesuit priest José Ramon Villarin, former president of Ateneo, compared the meaning of the Sacred Heart of Jesus to a life lived in service to others.

“May init ang pusong nagmamahal, may liwanag at linaw…. Sagrado ang pusong inilalabas en dibdib, nangangahas pa ring umasa and magtaya. Sagrado ang pusong may tapang na kumilos alang-alang sa napupusuan ng Diyos para sa kaniyang sinisintang bayan”, said Villarin.

(A heart that loves has warmth, light and clarity…. Sacred is the heart that still hopes and takes risks. Sacred is the heart that has the courage to serve those whom God loves, the country he loves dearly.)

SOLEMN MASS. Family, friends, allies and supporters of Aquino join in mass at the Church of the Gesú on June 24, 2022. Photo by Angie de Silva/Rappler

At the end of the mass, Aquino’s older sister, Ballsy Aquino-Cruz, thanked everyone who joined the mass in person and virtually. She considered them Aquino’s “true friends”, who supported him even when critics relentlessly attacked him after his presidency.

“A year ago our hearts sank when Noynoy breathed his last. But we gave it back to our Creator with gratitude for the blessing that he was: a simple, honest, self-effacing and decent Filipino who gave his all without fanfare when tasked to serve his bosses,” said Cruz.

She also recalled one of Aquino’s most iconic lines during his lifetime, which he uttered during his 2014 State of the Nation address.

“May I ask you to join me in reflecting on what he said, and I quote, ‘May you always believe, just like me, that the Filipino is truly worth fighting for. That the Filipino will indeed rise to the occasion, that God has a good plan for all of us and that it will happen in due time. Keep the faith, know this is just a phase,” Cruz said quoting his brother.


Family and friends remember Noynoy Aquino

The PNoy endowment fund will send scholarship holders to Ateneo

Ateneo de Manila University President Roberto Yap also said Aquino will always be remembered for serving the Philippines “with honor and dignity” and for raising the country’s status on the world stage.

“President Noy’s love for our country and our people, especially the poor and marginalized, is unquestionable. In the face of a planet in emergency mode, a chaotic political environment, wars in different places, disinformation and misinformation and a highly fractured society, we ask President Noy’s prayers that Ateneo and Ateneans become true beacons of God’s love and light in our world,” Yap said.

He announced that the endowment fund named after Aquino had raised 15 million pesos, which would fund the Ateneo education of several scholars from outside Metro Manila.


Family and friends remember Noynoy Aquino

Aquino’s Legacy

Most Mass attendees wore yellow-colored clothing or masks – a sign of support for the late president. Yellow was the color of protest closely associated with Noynoy and his late parents, democracy icons former Senator Benigno “Ninoy” Aquino Jr. and former President Corazon Aquino – opposition figures against the dictatorship of Ferdinand Marcos Sr.

They no longer saw the ascension to the presidency of dictator Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr.’s only son and namesake in the 2022 election.

Noynoy Aquino first entered politics as a congressional representative for Tarlac’s 2nd district. After serving three consecutive terms as a congressman, he successfully ran for the Senate and served as a senator from 2007 to 2010.

He initially had no intention of running for Malacañang in the 2010 election, but Aquino eventually sought the presidency following public outcry following his mother’s death in 2009.

Aquino will be remembered as the Filipino leader who brought China to justice and challenged Beijing’s bogus claims to the Western Philippine Sea. The Philippines would later win the case in July 2016, a month after Aquino’s term ended.

His anti-corruption campaign called “Daang Matuwid (Straight Path)” helped stabilize the Philippine economy.

MEMORY. Mass attendees watch a video remembering Aquino’s legacy after Mass on June 24, 2022. Photo by Angie de Silva/Rappler

His efforts to revive the peace process in Mindanao also paved the way for the preliminary peace agreement between the government and the Moro Islamic Liberation Front, which later resulted in the creation of the Bangsamoro Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao. .

Aquino remained a largely popular leader for most of his presidency – until the Mamasapano incident on January 25, 2015, where 44 elite cops were killed in an operation that targeted terrorists Abdulbasit Usman and the Malaysian manufacturer bombs Zulkifli Abdhir, better known as “Marwan”.

Despite this, his final public rating was “very good,” according to pollster Social Weather Stations. Rappler.com

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Marcos administrator should heed teachers’ call for pay rise, says Gatchalian – Reuters https://apasl2019manila.org/marcos-administrator-should-heed-teachers-call-for-pay-rise-says-gatchalian-reuters/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 07:23:00 +0000 https://apasl2019manila.org/marcos-administrator-should-heed-teachers-call-for-pay-rise-says-gatchalian-reuters/ The incoming administration of President-elect Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr. is expected to heed teachers’ call for a pay rise, which has been the lowest among Asian countries. Sen. Sherwin Gatchalian said the pay raise was already overdue and should be a priority for the Marcos administration. “We looked at the ASEAN teacher salary averages and […]]]>

The incoming administration of President-elect Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr. is expected to heed teachers’ call for a pay rise, which has been the lowest among Asian countries.

Sen. Sherwin Gatchalian said the pay raise was already overdue and should be a priority for the Marcos administration.

“We looked at the ASEAN teacher salary averages and we are one of the lowest. In fact, we are the third lowest in terms of salaries paid to our teachers,” Gatchalian said in a recent interview on CNN Philippines.

“The highest is Indonesia, their entry level there is nearly P60,000 – higher than Singapore – and Indonesia values ​​its teachers a lot,” he said.

Gatchalian, who currently heads the Senate Basic Education, Arts, and Culture Committee, said he has introduced a bill to improve the starting salary for 11th-grade public school teachers. (25,439 P) to 14th year (32,321 P). .

At the same time, he said he had also tabled a bill to add a few more tiers of teachers so there would be room for promotions.

“I agree that we should raise the salaries of teachers, so that we can deter being third-to-last in ASEAN. So we can at least enter the middle level of ASEAN,” said underlined the senator.

Gatchalian has repeatedly stressed the need to boost the morale of the country’s teachers, who have been at the forefront of the education sector, especially during the past two years of the COVID-19 pandemic.

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KUWTT: Covid cases up 82% | June 21, 2022 https://apasl2019manila.org/kuwtt-covid-cases-up-82-june-21-2022/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 20:46:36 +0000 https://apasl2019manila.org/kuwtt-covid-cases-up-82-june-21-2022/ Have a good day. Here are the articles from the Manila Times for Tuesday, June 21, 2022. READ: Covid cases up 82% THE Department of Health (DoH) on Monday reported an 82% increase in Covid-19 cases in the country. In its weekly case bulletin, the DoH said 3,051 cases were recorded from June 13 to […]]]>

Have a good day. Here are the articles from the Manila Times for Tuesday, June 21, 2022.

READ: Covid cases up 82%

THE Department of Health (DoH) on Monday reported an 82% increase in Covid-19 cases in the country. In its weekly case bulletin, the DoH said 3,051 cases were recorded from June 13 to June 19, a daily average of 436. That’s 82% more than the cases reported from June 6 to June 12. Undersecretary of Health and Spokesperson Rosario Vergeire said the National Capital Region or Metro Manila is particularly experiencing “an onset of spike in case counts” similar to the September 2021 and January 2022 spikes driven by the Delta and Omicron variants. Vergeire made it clear that the current trend cannot be called a “push” and that it will only confuse the minds of the public. She attributed the rise in cases to Omicron subvariants, increased mobility and diminished population immunity due to the slow delivery of booster shots. Of 55 million Filipinos eligible for boosters, only 14 million received boosters.

READ: Marcos to lead DA

PRESIDENT-ELECT Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr. will temporarily act as Secretary of the Department of Agriculture (DA) on Monday to address the agriculture sector’s most pressing concerns. At a press briefing, the new leader said the problem in the agricultural sector was “serious”. His decision to lead the agriculture department was not just to make it clear what priority we place on the agricultural sector, but also from a practical perspective to get things moving quickly,” he added. One of his plans is to rebuild the agricultural value chain, and one of the ways to do this is to change the organizational structure of the DA.

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READ: Sara plans in-person classes next school year

VICE President-Elect and incoming Secretary of Education Sara Duterte-Carpio plans to resume full face-to-face classes in the next school year. Outgoing Education Secretary Leonor Briones has said the Department for Education (DepEd) wants all schools to resume physical lessons for the 2022-23 school year. The Ministry of Education said that as of June 16, 32,787 public schools and 1,063 private schools had returned to face-to-face lessons. During a Monday press briefing, Duterte-Carpio said she would meet with DepEd officials on June 25 to organize the transition of teaching online. Duterte-Carpio also said she would follow the initiatives of the current administration for more benefits for teachers.

READ: Bank freezes Okada Manila account

OKADA Manila’s bank accounts have been frozen due to the intra-company dispute in Tiger Resort Leisure and Entertainment Inc. (TRLEI), the operator of the hotel-casino and resort located in Parañaque City. TRLEI legal counsel Estrella Elamparo said the banking institutions involved in freezing Okada Manila’s accounts include BDO Unibank (BDO), Asia United Bank and Union Bank of the Philippines. With the standstill ante order (SQAO) issued by the Supreme Court last April, banks have become more cautious in handling Okada Manila’s financial transactions, Elamparo said. BDO, in particular, also demanded that the former TRLEI board of directors, led by Hajime Tokuda and Byron Yip, and the one formed by Kazuo Okada, led by Filipino businessman Antonio “Tonyboy” Cojuangco and Dindo Espeleta, sign an agreement to pay the salaries of Okada Manila employees.

BUSINESS: Peso weakens further to 54:$1 on Monday

In business, the Philippine peso depreciated further, crossing the $54 per dollar level on Monday. The local currency closed at P54.065 to the dollar on Monday, lower than the close of P53.75 on Friday June 17th. This is the weakest performance since the close of P54.08 to the dollar on October 12, 2018. Monday’s close also has already breached the upper limit of the government’s exchange rate P50-53:1 peso -dollar expected for the year.

SPORTS: NU shoot for UAAP volleyball crown

Leading the sports, National University aim for the season sweep and championship when they take on De La Salle University (DLSU) in Game 2 of the Women’s Volleyball Season 84 Finals. University Athletic Association of the Philippines (UAAP) at the Mall of Asia Arena today, June 21. The game is set for 6:30 p.m. after the individual plum award ceremonies. The Lady Bulldogs have won all of their 15 games this season, including a 25-20, 25-12, 25-21 sweep of the Lady Spikers in Game 1 last Saturday. Drawing MVP chants from NU fans, super rookie Bella Belen led the way for NU in this game with 15 points in addition to 13 excellent receptions.

READ: Opinion and Editorial

Antonio Contreras and Yen Makabenta are the front-page columnists today. Contreras laments the inequality of justice, while Makabenta compares the rise of Bongbong Marcos to that of two former prime ministers.

Today’s editorial discusses modest proposals for culture and the arts. Read a full version in the opinion section of the newspaper or listen to the voice of the times.

For more news and information, get a copy of The Manila Times on paper, subscribe to his digital edition or log on to www.manilatimes.net. follow us on Twitter, Facebook Where instagram and Track times.

On behalf of the Manila Times, this is Aric John Sy Cua reporting. Have a safe Tuesday.

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CEE Celebrates 75 Years of U.S.-Philippine Relations with “Philippines Matter to America” ​​Publication https://apasl2019manila.org/cee-celebrates-75-years-of-u-s-philippine-relations-with-philippines-matter-to-america-publication/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 08:46:56 +0000 https://apasl2019manila.org/cee-celebrates-75-years-of-u-s-philippine-relations-with-philippines-matter-to-america-publication/ Heather Variava, Acting Chargé d’Affaires at the U.S. Embassy in the Philippines, is joined by Assistant Secretary of the Department of Foreign Affairs Jose Victor Chan-Gonzaga and Under Secretary of the Department of Defense Cardozo Luna , at the launch of the EWC publication in Manila. Manila, June 17, 2022—To celebrate 75 years of […]]]>

Heather Variava, Acting Chargé d’Affaires at the U.S. Embassy in the Philippines, is joined by Assistant Secretary of the Department of Foreign Affairs Jose Victor Chan-Gonzaga and Under Secretary of the Department of Defense Cardozo Luna , at the launch of the EWC publication in Manila.


Manila, June 17, 2022—To celebrate 75 years of U.S.-Philippine relations, the East-West Center (EWC) launched the “Philippines Matters for America/America Matters for the Philippines” publication and website in Washington, D.C. on June 13 and in Manila on June 15. .

Produced by EWC with support from the U.S. Embassy in the Philippines, the publication and accompanying data visualizations highlight the deep historical and contemporary significance of the U.S.-Philippine relationship, with an analysis of economic, diplomatic and cultural ties at the national level. , state and local.

CEE President Suzanne Vares-Lum noted that the business, diplomacy, security, education and tourism statistics presented in the publication “paint a picture of the positive impact of the U.S.-Philippine relationship.” “. EWC Vice President Satu Limaye added that it also showed “the scope and depth of the relationship and cooperation between our two countries”.

“Although the challenges are different than they were 75 years ago, our countries are still working side by side,” said Heather Variava, Chargé d’Affaires a.i. at the U.S. Embassy in the Philippines. “We stand firmly united in the Philippines and as we mark the culmination of the 75th anniversary of our diplomatic relations, the history of our cooperation as friends, partners and allies makes us extremely proud.”

Philippine Ambassador to the United States Jose Manuel G. Romualdez said there is no doubt that the Philippines matters to the United States and the United States matters to the Philippines. He added that the relationship between the two countries “has definitely stood the test of time and remains relevant in the face of new and emerging challenges.”

“As President-elect Ferdinand Marcos, Jr. told Assistant Secretary of State Wendy Sherman during their recent meeting in Manila, the Philippines’ partnership with the United States ‘is not just a memory, but a part of us,’” said Ambassador Romualdez. “This is true not only in terms of our government-to-government relationship, but also in the close ties between our two peoples. This publication best summarizes the result of 75 long years of partnership in many areas such as politics and security, economy and people-to-people ties.

To view the publication, visit https://asiamattersforamerica.org/philippines/publications.

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The Fulbright Project seeks to tell untold chapters of the fascinating history of English in the Philippines – Press and Guide https://apasl2019manila.org/the-fulbright-project-seeks-to-tell-untold-chapters-of-the-fascinating-history-of-english-in-the-philippines-press-and-guide/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 18:01:24 +0000 https://apasl2019manila.org/the-fulbright-project-seeks-to-tell-untold-chapters-of-the-fascinating-history-of-english-in-the-philippines-press-and-guide/ For the linguist Daniel Davis, English is a language that has traveled the world and evolved surprisingly wherever it has found its place. Like other sociolinguists, he often speaks of English, in the plural, or precedes the term with a modifier to designate the variety he is speaking of, for example American English, Scottish English, […]]]>

For the linguist Daniel Davis, English is a language that has traveled the world and evolved surprisingly wherever it has found its place. Like other sociolinguists, he often speaks of English, in the plural, or precedes the term with a modifier to designate the variety he is speaking of, for example American English, Scottish English, Indian English or Filipino English. It’s not just a linguistic idiot thing. For him, the plural better reflects how the language actually evolved historically and was shaped by all who encountered, adopted and shaped it. It also helps eliminate the lingering idea that there is only one correct English. “I taught English and linguistics in Hong Kong for eight years, and some students almost teased me that they spoke the correct English, because they spoke British English,” Davis says. “And in the late 1800s, New England English was seen as a model in the United States. So with language, what interests me is not models or accuracy, it’s variation and cultural identity.”

Davis’ work in this discipline of World English has focused on three distinct geographical areas: the various forms of English spoken in the British Isles and Europe, North American English people, and those who have found refuge in the Pacific, such as Hong Kong. and the Philippines. The latter is the subject of Davis’ most recent research, which he is now renewing in a second Fulbright scholarship, after his 2020 Fulbright was cut short by the pandemic. The history of English in the Philippines, where along with Filipino the language has official status, is indeed a rich history. From the mid-1500s until 1898, the Philippines was a Spanish colony, but after the American victory in the Spanish–American War, it became a territory of the United States. An important feature of this new period of American colonialism was American English, which, along with other subjects, was taught in hundreds of new public schools built in the early 20th century. As a result, says Davis, English spread rapidly across the country. He says records indicate that over 50 years, about a third of people in the Philippines said they spoke English.

So why has English taken hold so quickly in the Philippines? Davis says there are a number of factors. Some scholars claim that the Philippines adopted English as a symbol of 20th century modernity. English also provided access to education within the new American public school system, and knowledge of English was increasingly a gateway to new business opportunities across Asia. But he says another part of the story may be that the Philippines, historically, has always been a place where linguistic diversity has thrived. Long before the American (or even Spanish) presence there, the Philippines were already extremely multilingual. Due to its geography (the Philippines consists of over 7,000 islands), the country is home to around 180 different languages. “Everyone speaks two, three, four languages ​​– on a daily basis, depending on the social environment,” Davis explains. “For example, at the university where I was, a department administrator could speak fluent English at the university. But on the street, if she hails a minibus, everything will be in Tagalog, which is the main language spoken in Manila. But then, when calling her relatives in northern Luzon, she would speak to them in the local language, which is Ilocano. This kind of constant language switching is almost impossible for many Americans to imagine, but it is part of the routine of life in the Philippines.

All of these languages ​​not only coexist, but intertwine, and this is where the history of English in the Philippines gets really interesting, says Davis. Due to its roots, Filipino English, recognized by linguists as a distinct form for decades, is grammatically very similar to American English. But the pronunciations are different and its vocabulary is more extensive, thanks to words borrowed from the rich linguistic ecosystem of the Philippines. While in Manila in early 2020, before the pandemic put her Fulbright scholarship on hiatus, Davis got to experience all sorts of Filipino English words and phrases firsthand. In the university cafeteria, for example, everyone uses reusable containers called baunan, which are kind of like split reusable lunch boxes that you bring from home and then put your food in to take back to your table. . When he returns in January, he will prepare pasalubongs, small gifts that you bring back from a trip for your friends and colleagues. At the post office near the university, the sign indicating where to form a line reads “Fall in”, a phrase due to the long presence of the American army in the country. The day someone called him “kuya Daniel”, attaching the term of brotherly endearment to his own name, was definitely a highlight.

Undoubtedly, how to tell the complex history of English in the Philippines, as Davis hopes his research can help to do, definitely poses one of those challenges where to start. So Davis says he will approach the work in two directions: starting with the present and working backwards, then starting from the past and tracing history back in time. For the first, he will make many observations on the way English is used in everyday life and on its social and cultural value. On the historical side, he plans to dig deep into the unique collections of the Ateneo de Manila University’s Rizal Library, which houses the American Historical Collection consisting of tens of thousands of documents, photographs and archives chronicling the history of before and after the war. -independence American involvement in the Philippines. Additionally, the university has extensive records relating to early English teaching in the Philippines, including items such as textbooks that Filipino children are said to have used in the early 1900s.

“For example, I was looking at an education report from 1925, and educators were already realizing the need for culturally appropriate materials, maybe as early as 1907,” Davis says. “The very first English textbooks were imported from the United States, but almost immediately American teachers adapted the books to refer to the flora and fauna of Filipino life, and very soon a new variety of English – Filipino English – started to develop. And I just found it fascinating that they’re trying to rework the program. On the one hand, it’s an expression of resistance. But it’s also the expression of people who find use in the language and who clearly want to make it their own.

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Seven Deadly Sins | Opinion of the applicant https://apasl2019manila.org/seven-deadly-sins-opinion-of-the-applicant/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 20:30:00 +0000 https://apasl2019manila.org/seven-deadly-sins-opinion-of-the-applicant/ I have long argued that agriculture is far too important to be left to agriculture department (DA) alone. Our agriculture and fisheries sector is the concern of all Filipinos, because it is on it that our ability to feed our people depends, while providing important products other than food. Last week, I suggested that getting […]]]>

I have long argued that agriculture is far too important to be left to agriculture department (DA) alone. Our agriculture and fisheries sector is the concern of all Filipinos, because it is on it that our ability to feed our people depends, while providing important products other than food. Last week, I suggested that getting back to the two basics – our people and our land – should be the top priority in planning the way forward for the nation. Having discussed the former, particularly in terms of solving our grave education crisis, I now turn to our land, particularly to maximize the value and benefits we derive from our farms, and from the coastal waters and interior.

Of the three major economic sectors, agriculture is the most evenly distributed across the country’s regions. In stark contrast, Metro Manila and Calabarzon alone already account for over half of our services gross domestic product, while for our industry’s GDP, over half comes from Calabarzon, Metro Manila and Central Luzon alone. Agriculture is truly our most inclusive economic sector and our best bet for achieving inclusive economic development.

The fact that the new president has taken his time in appointing his secretary of agriculture suggests that he sees the success of his presidency crucially depending on the performance of the sector. A reliable source tells me that he would like to see a major overhaul and restructuring of the agricultural bureaucracy if Philippine agriculture were to cease to lag far behind that of our neighbors, whose agricultural experts we once mentored. So he needs a secretary of agriculture who can actually preside over such a big cleaning and renovation of the house. Having studied the sector for decades, I concluded long ago that what Philippine agriculture needs most is fundamental bureaucratic and institutional reform, without which it would simply continue to hold back our progress. overall economy.

It’s not a problem of lack of knowledge or technology to increase productivity; we have had it for a long time at the University of the Philippines Los Baños and our other agricultural knowledge centers, where we have even taught our neighbors since the 1960s. Rather, it is our persistent failure to ensure that our farmers apply and benefit from this knowledge correctly and widely on farms across the country, because of what I would call the “seven deadly sins” of our DA. The DA (1) persisted in a centralized, largely top-down approach to sector management, despite the decentralization mandated by the 1991 Local Government Code; (2) was unduly obsessed with self-sufficiency in rice, to the relative detriment of other crops, both in terms of attention and budget; (3) excessively focused on agricultural production and neglected the rest of the agricultural value chain for a holistic systems perspective; (4) was largely structured and organized around products rather than the core core functions it must perform under the mandated decentralized setup; (5) relied primarily on protecting our farmers by closing our domestic markets to foreign competition, instead of encouraging them to educate themselves so that they can compete well and prosper in our domestic and export markets; (6) failed to respond to the fragmentation of our farms resulting from land reform and generational separation, through effective consolidation and consolidation programs that our neighbors had used to good effect; and (7) neglected to work with public and private financial institutions to ensure farmers have broad access to working capital, so that they can maximize the use of superior technologies and inputs, take advantage of improved productivity and thus increase the income and well-being of their families.

Furthermore, it is no secret that a large part of our agricultural budget has not been used wisely for the benefit of farmers, but ends up in the wrong pockets of a bureaucracy traditionally known for its pots -of wine and its corruption. I have been writing about suggested solutions to all of these “sins” for the past 20 years. But old habits die hard and we have yet to see substantial reform in the agricultural bureaucracy since then. Meanwhile, Filipino farmers and food consumers continue to suffer.

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Ben Diokno – Manila Standard https://apasl2019manila.org/ben-diokno-manila-standard/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 04:10:10 +0000 https://apasl2019manila.org/ben-diokno-manila-standard/ ON THURSDAY, June 9, I had the great pleasure of introducing Benjaimin E. Diokno, outgoing Governor of Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas, as a guest speaker from the Rotary Club of Manila. Ben Diokno’s reputation precedes him. He is eminent. He’s a public figure. He accomplished a lot – from simple to good to really big. […]]]>

ON THURSDAY, June 9, I had the great pleasure of introducing Benjaimin E. Diokno, outgoing Governor of Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas, as a guest speaker from the Rotary Club of Manila.

Ben Diokno’s reputation precedes him.

He is eminent. He’s a public figure. He accomplished a lot – from simple to good to really big.

He has rendered great service to our country and its people during a distinguished professional career that spans more than half a century.

Ben Diokno wants to do more as secretary to President Bongbong Marcos at the Ministry of Finance (DOF). BBM is the fourth president he will serve.

What does it take to achieve the many things? In a word, gravity. It means seriousness or solemnity in manner. Sa Tagalog: dating (emphasis on second syllable).

First, Ben is a serious scholar. This gives him maturity and authority of intellect. Scholarship is nothing without two other attributes: first, a passion for excellence, and second, a love of people and country.

These two attributes, Ben has many, so abundant they cannot be measured with ordinary performance metrics.

His departure as head of the BSP means a loss of 20 million pesos in annual salary, to settle for 2.5 million pesos paid per year to the DOF.

His passion is like that of the Taal Volcano (he’s from Taal, Batangas, by the way) – seemingly calm on the surface but bubbling below, with occasional bursts of energy, wisdom and brilliance – on matters that overlap politics, good governance, and money, especially other people’s money.

He has impressive credentials: BA in Public Administration, UP 1968; Masters in Public Administration, UP 1970; Master of Arts in Political Economy, Johns Hopkins University, Maryland, 1976; and Ph.D. in Economics, Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York, 1981.

As a young man of 38, as Cory Aquino’s undersecretary of the budget, he helped devise the 1986 tax reform program that simplified income tax and introduced value added tax. .

In 1981 he helped design the local government code of the Philippines.

As President Estrada’s budget secretary from 1998 to 2001, he introduced transparency in the allocation and spending of public funds. Called the WYSWIG – an acronym for what you see is what you get – the system has simplified budget fund releases.

He reformed public procurement using information and communication technologies.

As President Duterte’s budget secretary, he pursued an expansionary fiscal policy to finance investment in human capital and physical infrastructure.

He coined the mantra “The Golden Age of Infrastructure” or what is commonly referred to as Build, Build, Build, ushered the Philippines into the modern era because the Duterte administration poured 5 trillion pesos in the infra.

Meanwhile, during his short stint as BSP Governor, he enabled more than 30 million Filipinos to have a bank account, through the power of digitalization.

It will also use this power to cut red tape, reduce corruption and improve governance.

He has kept the Philippine banking system liquid, stable and proactive.

At BSP, Ben became the world’s greatest central banker. When the worst pandemic of the century hit, he acted quickly and decisively.

It poured an unprecedented 2.3 trillion pesos into the financial system to help the economy recover.

It lent 540 billion pesos to the Duterte government to procure vaccines and help the needy and displaced.

He said: “We looked for solutions and acted boldly in the face of difficult situations.”

His audacity transformed the economy, transformed the people, transformed the

Philippines.

No other government official, in fact, no other Filipino, has done more to help our people and our economy recover during the pandemic.

From the depths of despair with an economic decline of 16.9% in the second quarter of 2020, the worst crisis in the country’s history, the economy has recovered strongly, with an impressive growth of 8.3% in the first quarter. of 2022.

It has made our money plastic, tactile, metallic, luminous and waterproof; and put animals and flora and nature pictures on it. Like the sampaguita, the eagle, the pearl of the South Seas, the Tubbataha reef.

More than seven out of 10 Filipinos are fully immunized. It means herd immunity. This herd immunity restored the health of Filipinos and restored the health of the economy as Filipinos began to spend money again – to go out, dine, shop or simply enjoy daily outdoor fun.

And the Philippines have proven their resilience. It retained its investment grade ratings. This should lead to a cheap cost of capital, more jobs, more financial stability and some of the highest growth rates in Asia and the world of emerging economies.

Ben became the best central banker in the world when he was barely a year in the job.

Imagine what he can do, as the next finance secretary, managing Asia’s freest democracy, the world’s 12th largest consumer market and one of the world’s largest races – Filipinos.

So far, Ben is enthusiastic about his job as the next head of DOF.

As head of BBM’s economics team, he made many important promises – to reduce inflation from the current 5% to 4.6% for the whole of 2022 and between 2 and 4% in 2023; reduce the public deficit to a percentage of GDP or the value of economic output, from 7% to 3% by the end of the BBM presidency; ensuring that Filipinos become middle income with a single-digit incidence of poverty also during the same period; and to continue to pour money into Build, Build, Build, education and people’s health.

It does not seem focused on imposing new, higher taxes. But he wants to keep the current excise taxes on fuel and other refined petroleum products.

Excise duties and VAT collected this year could amount to 105.9 billion pesos.

Instead of giving up much of that tax money, Ben Diokno wants targeted aid to vulnerable sectors like jeepney drivers, fishermen and farmers.

Moreover, he fears that once excise taxes are reduced or abandoned, they will disappear forever.

biznewsasia@gmail.com

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