Manila economy – APASL 2019 Manila http://apasl2019manila.org/ Fri, 01 Jul 2022 08:51:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://apasl2019manila.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.jpg Manila economy – APASL 2019 Manila http://apasl2019manila.org/ 32 32 The public debt burden eases in May https://apasl2019manila.org/the-public-debt-burden-eases-in-may/ Fri, 01 Jul 2022 05:34:00 +0000 https://apasl2019manila.org/the-public-debt-burden-eases-in-may/ MANILA, Philippines — After repaying its debt to the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas, the national government saw its obligations ease in May, but concerns remain as growing obligations threaten to limit the state’s spending choices. Treasury data released on Friday showed that outstanding government debt fell 2.1% month-on-month to 12.5 trillion pesos in May. Of […]]]>

MANILA, Philippines — After repaying its debt to the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas, the national government saw its obligations ease in May, but concerns remain as growing obligations threaten to limit the state’s spending choices.

Treasury data released on Friday showed that outstanding government debt fell 2.1% month-on-month to 12.5 trillion pesos in May. Of the outstanding debt, 69.7% came from domestic sources while 30.7% came from external creditors.

The halt in debt growth is the result of the national government repaying 300 billion pesos to BSP, which loaned the state money to help fund its coronavirus programs. The loan was due in June, but the government prepaid it in May.

Since the beginning of the year, debts have accumulated by 6.5% or 767.2 billion pesos.

Disaggregated, domestic borrowing reached 8.67 trillion pesos in May, down 3% from end-April levels. External debt increased by 0.1% month on month, largely due to the depreciation of the peso which cost 15.04 billion pula.

Rapidly growing debt means the Marcos Jr. administration would have to find ways to rack up more revenue for government spending while navigating tight fiscal space.

At the end of 2021, government liabilities already represented 60.5% of the country’s gross domestic product, the highest ratio since 2005 and exceeding the 60% threshold deemed manageable for emerging market economies.

“We think the plan to outgrow debt by permanently betting on 7% GDP growth is a bit too optimistic. Next year GDP will lose momentum due to base effects from the pandemic. and the economy will face headwinds from slowing economic growth in advanced economies,” said Domini Velasquez, chief economist at China Banking Corp.

“Ultimately, we believe the government will eventually resort to raising taxes to help reduce the country’s outstanding debt. There are many options that will not disproportionately harm the poor,” he added. Velasquez.

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Industrial company profits improved in May https://apasl2019manila.org/industrial-company-profits-improved-in-may/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 16:14:53 +0000 https://apasl2019manila.org/industrial-company-profits-improved-in-may/ BEIJING: Profits at China’s major industrial companies fell at a slower pace in May as factories in the world’s second-largest economy resumed production and the business climate improved, official data showed on Monday. Large industrial companies with revenues of at least 20 million yuan (about $2.99 ​​million) saw their collective profit fall 6.5% year-on-year last […]]]>

BEIJING: Profits at China’s major industrial companies fell at a slower pace in May as factories in the world’s second-largest economy resumed production and the business climate improved, official data showed on Monday.

Large industrial companies with revenues of at least 20 million yuan (about $2.99 ​​million) saw their collective profit fall 6.5% year-on-year last month, an improvement from the fall of 8.5% in April, according to figures from the National Bureau of Statistics (BNS).

Their earnings jumped 6.8% in May from a year earlier, faster than the figure recorded the previous month.

SNB senior statistician Zhu Hong attributed the slower decline in profits to effective Covid-19 controls, a rebound in business activities and smoother logistics.

In the first five months of 2022, major industrial enterprises made about 3.44 trillion yuan in total, up 1 percent from a year ago.

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Of the country’s 41 industry sectors, 20 reported annual profit growth or a tighter year-on-year profit contraction in May, while five managed to reverse their downward trend towards post expansion. -profit.

Last month, the country’s northeastern region and the Yangtze River Delta, where the megacity of Shanghai is located, reported a drop in industrial profits much smaller than in April, as these regions gradually shed the impact of the Covid-19 epidemic.

Boosted by political support and relatively high prices, the energy sector saw its profits jump in May. Profits in the coal, petroleum and natural gas mining industries more than doubled, contributing 9.5% to overall industrial profit growth last month.

Marginal profits in the equipment manufacturing sector improved from April, and better profits were also reported among producers of consumer goods last month.

Despite the positive news, Zhu warned that given the relatively weak recovery base and the ever-changing external landscape, uncertainties still abound for industrial companies.

China’s leading economic indicators improved in May. One of them, value-added industrial production, reversed its decline in April and posted a year-on-year expansion last month.

To support the economy, the State Council recently unveiled a set of 33 measures aimed at further stabilizing the economy.

The Ministry of Industry pledged to focus on stabilizing industrial chains and strengthen support for small and medium enterprises to ensure the implementation of the policy package.

Building on May’s momentum, Chinese industrial firms are likely to post better profits in June, said Zheng Houcheng, director of the Yingda Securities Research Institute.

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Agreeing agriculture as a super priority – Manila Bulletin https://apasl2019manila.org/agreeing-agriculture-as-a-super-priority-manila-bulletin/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 22:18:00 +0000 https://apasl2019manila.org/agreeing-agriculture-as-a-super-priority-manila-bulletin/ At the end of June, the Philippines will inaugurate the newly elected administration led by Ferdinand Marcos, Jr. A lot of hopes and aspirations are invested in the new government on the back of the overwhelming number of votes won by the elected president and his vice president. . Even before assuming the leadership role, […]]]>

At the end of June, the Philippines will inaugurate the newly elected administration led by Ferdinand Marcos, Jr. A lot of hopes and aspirations are invested in the new government on the back of the overwhelming number of votes won by the elected president and his vice president. .

Even before assuming the leadership role, President-elect Marcos, Jr. is already treading water with a number of irresistible woes besetting the nation – rising fuel prices, runaway inflation, the depreciation of the peso, a soaring budget deficit, the lingering threat of a surge in COVID cases and food supply disruptions, among others. A reason for a break? It sounds more like an urgent call to rush to me.

But all is not as bad as it seems. The Philippines’ economic fundamentals are still solid. OFW remittances are buoyant, our sovereign debt rating is stable, Q1 GDP growth was solid at 8.3%, unemployment is down and consumer spending is up. Certainly, inflation must be brought under control, but great care must be taken not to stifle the nascent economic recovery in the bud. After all, the biggest worry for businesses outside of inflation is probably stagflation or, worse, a recession – especially so soon after the devastation wrought by the pandemic.

New economic managers will certainly find a way forward. I am very encouraged by the early tone given by the new Finance Secretary, Benjamin Diokno, that we can grow despite the headwinds facing us. Yet I have cautious optimism given the rush of international institutions to revise global economic growth forecasts.

Beyond the short to medium term horizon, however, there are more structural concerns that have been revealed by the pandemic in its immediate aftermath. The one that really strikes me as surprising is the country’s food security or, more specifically, the lack thereof. Recently, we have had to resort to increased imports of basic products such as rice, pork and, more recently, chicken. Even vegetables would be imported from China. Of course, a number of externalities such as the spread of African swine flu, rising livestock feed prices and damage from natural disasters have all contributed to the need to increase our supplies and stabilize rising prices. On the other hand, I think there is a lot to be done to reduce our vulnerability by defining an integrated national master plan that will tackle the systemic flaws in our local supply chain. The recent announcement by President-elect Marcos that he will lead the Ministry of Agriculture gives hope that much-needed reform is underway.

Amid the pandemic, it was painful to hear reports of fresh produce being dumped due to the inability to get goods to market. Additionally, the cost of farmland intervention for consumers could drive up prices, making imports relatively cheaper. Just recently, I heard that farm gate prices for squash, for example, could drop as low as 40 pesos per kilo at source. By the time it hits supermarket shelves, it could sell for up to 120 pesos. That’s quite a disparity by any measure. Additionally, productivity issues could also be responsible for our inability to maximize agricultural production.

I am not an expert in agro-economics nor a professional in the field of micro-enterprises or cooperative management. What I do know, however, is that an agriculture-based economy like the Philippines should at least be able to feed its people at reasonable prices.

A few weeks ago, my hopes of making even small progress towards food security were fueled by a movement called Agripreneur Harvest Love (AHL). It is a social enterprise that involves organizing farmers so that they can easily access markets, earn a fair return on their produce, and use clean, ethical, safe and sustainable means of food production. These are noble missions, yes, but I see them more as a journey than a destination. It starts as a modest move that can eventually grow into a more compelling partnership. AHL aims to reduce, if not eliminate, the levels of middlemen by connecting farmers directly to consumers.

By connecting farmers directly to consumers, AHL is able to help farmers sell their produce at fair prices while giving shoppers the ability to purchase fresh, supermarket-quality produce at source-direct prices. It’s a win-win situation. If farmers make better profits, then they can invest to adopt more sustainable farming methods and improve productivity.

The model looks simple and straightforward. Maybe that’s what will make it work. We have to start somewhere and I’m convinced AHL is onto something really exciting.

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Shanghai reports zero Covid cases for first time since outbreak – Manila Bulletin https://apasl2019manila.org/shanghai-reports-zero-covid-cases-for-first-time-since-outbreak-manila-bulletin/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 05:52:00 +0000 https://apasl2019manila.org/shanghai-reports-zero-covid-cases-for-first-time-since-outbreak-manila-bulletin/ BEIJING, China — China reported no new Covid-19 infections in Shanghai for the first time since March on Saturday, as the country’s latest outbreak eases after months of virus-driven lockdowns and restrictions. China is the last major economy still committed to a zero Covid strategy, eliminating new cases with a combination of targeted lockdowns, mass […]]]>

BEIJING, China — China reported no new Covid-19 infections in Shanghai for the first time since March on Saturday, as the country’s latest outbreak eases after months of virus-driven lockdowns and restrictions.

China is the last major economy still committed to a zero Covid strategy, eliminating new cases with a combination of targeted lockdowns, mass testing and lengthy quarantines.

The economic hub of Shanghai was forced into a months-long lockdown during a Covid surge this spring driven by the fast-spreading variant of Omicron, while the capital Beijing closed schools and offices for weeks during of a separate epidemic.

Infections have dwindled to a trickle in recent days, with Shanghai reporting zero locally transmitted cases on Saturday for the first time since the outbreak began in early March.

“There were no new confirmed domestic cases of Covid-19 and no new asymptomatic domestic infections in Shanghai on June 24, 2022,” the city said in a statement.

The lockdown for Shanghai’s 25 million people was all but lifted in early June, but the metropolis has struggled to return to normal as individual neighborhoods reimposed restrictions in response to new infections.

Millions of people in the city were temporarily locked down again two weeks ago after the government ordered a new campaign of mass testing.

In Beijing, restrictions first imposed in May were eased as cases fell, but tightened again this month after a cluster of infections linked to nightlife emerged.

After days of mass testing and localized lockdowns, the ‘Heaven Supermarket infection chain’ – named after the popular bar visited by patients – has effectively been brought to a standstill, authorities in Beijing said last week.

The city’s education office said Saturday that all elementary and middle school students could return to their classrooms for in-person instruction on Monday, after the bar group delayed the reopening of schools.

All school staff, students and parents must take a Covid PCR test before returning to school, and are urged to “limit outings and avoid gatherings”, the office said. education in an official social media post.

Beijing reported two new local infections on Saturday.

China insists the zero-Covid policy is necessary to prevent a health calamity, with officials pointing to unevenly distributed medical resources and low vaccination rates among the elderly as major concerns.

But the strategy has hammered the world’s second-largest economy, and tough enforcement has also sparked rare protests, while the extreme isolation of foreign businesses and middle-class families has pushed them to make exit plans.

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TRANSFIGURATION OF MINDANAO: Compelling Reading | MindaNews https://apasl2019manila.org/transfiguration-of-mindanao-compelling-reading-mindanews/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 07:18:29 +0000 https://apasl2019manila.org/transfiguration-of-mindanao-compelling-reading-mindanews/ (Welcome address and keynote address by Fr. Joel Tabora, SJ, President of Ateneo de Davao University) On behalf of Ateneo de Davao University, I welcome you to this launch of the 788-page volume, Transfiguring Mindanao: A Reader, edited by Jose Jowel Canuday and Joselito Sescon and published this year by Ateneo de Manila Press. It’s […]]]>

(Welcome address and keynote address by Fr. Joel Tabora, SJ, President of Ateneo de Davao University)

On behalf of Ateneo de Davao University, I welcome you to this launch of the 788-page volume, Transfiguring Mindanao: A Reader, edited by Jose Jowel Canuday and Joselito Sescon and published this year by Ateneo de Manila Press. It’s good to finally have a book that focuses on Mindanao not just as a subject of academic research, but as a complex reality in need of transfiguration.

Part of the genesis of this book has to do with a bit of Jesuit history.

Prof. Joel Tabora, President of Ateneo de Davao University, delivers his welcome address and keynote address at the book launch, Transfiguring Mindanao: A Mindanao Reader, held at ADDU on June 22, 2022. Photo published with the kind permission of IGY CASTRILLO

In 1814, the Society of Jesus was officially restored by Pope Pius VII after its suppression by Pope Clement XIV in 1773. In 2014, Jesuits and partner communities all over the world celebrated the bicentenary of the restoration of the Society of Jesus. Its celebration in the Philippines allowed us to remember the return of the Jesuits to the Philippines in 1859 – 45 years after the restoration. It is important for us to note this today: the original mandate of the returning Jesuits was to evangelize Mindanao. Unfortunately, their intention to fulfill this mandate was upset by the Spanish colonial government in Manila who insisted that the Jesuits stay in Manila and get involved in education. One of the main results of this decision was the Ateneo de Manila University.

In the Philippine celebration of this Bicentenary of the Restoration of the Society of Jesus led by the Provincial Superior of Mindanaoan, Fr. Antonio Moreno, SJ, this original mandate in Mindanao was part of the mandate given to Jesuits in the Philippines during the last decade to rethink their ministries and ultimately recommit as a whole province to the mission of the Church in Mindanao. The other mandate was Pope Francis’ visit to the Philippines in 2013. During this visit, 40 Jesuits had the privilege of meeting him despite his busy schedule. It was in a sala at the nuncio’s residence in Manila. I was there, delighted to meet this charismatic witness to the joy of the Gospel. When Fr. Moreno asked the Pope, to whom we Jesuits have a special vow of obedience, what he wanted from us, he replied: “Go to the peripheries. Go to the poor. For us, it was an invitation to renewal. And to our future as a Province of Jesuits in the Philippines.

Suddenly all the Jesuits in the Philippines were focused on Mindanao. For was it not appropriate that they recover the original mandate of the Jesuits to work in the missions of Mindanao? And didn’t Pope Francis, the Vicar of Christ, actually send us a mission to Mindanao, where there were no more peripheral people in the Philippines than in Mindanao? And where there were no poorer people than in Mindanao?

It is in this context that the Jesuits and the lay collaborators met from December 26 to 28, 2013 in the Finster auditorium of this university for the Conversations in Mindanao, an opportunity to reflect on the impulses that could frame a reorientation of the Province of the Philippines towards Mindanao. They were many: the need to fight against the worst poverty in the Philippines, the relentless war in Mindanao, the various calls for independence or self-determination by Filipino Muslim communities and movements, the historical injustices committed by the Spanish colonizers and the Philippine state on the Muslims of Mindanao, the injustice done to the Mindanaoans through the homesteading and resettlement programs under the Americans, the colonial government and under the dictator Ferdinand Marcos, by which Muslims and Lumads were driven from their land to accommodate Filipino settlers from the north, the alienation of Mindanao’s economy from the peoples of Mindanao to further the national economy or the private interests of actors benefiting the national economy, the destruction of the once vast forest resources of Mindanao, the major new threats to the Mindanao ecology presented by open pit mining rt on a large scale.

At the book launch at ADDU. Photo courtesy of IGY CASTRILLO

The impulses from the Mindanao Conversations were further discussed by a Mindanao Conversations Implementation Committee which ultimately formulated a proposed Philippine roadmap for Mindanao.

A first proposed roadmap for Mindanao formulated in 2015 states in the context of a general commitment to the new evangelization, the fight against poverty and inequality and the protection of the environment:

“The compelling vision emerging from this Kairos moment would be to respond with the whole Province with boldness and creativity to the immediate and pressing apostolic challenges of Mindanao, always as a whole on the periphery of the Philippines. This includes the ongoing resolution of conflicts and wars in Mindanao due to injustice towards Moro identity, Moro political sovereignty and integral Moro development in the impending Bangsamoro, exploitation and displacement of indigenous peoples for l political and economic interest of others, pressure for basic education, especially of Moro peoples in the Bangsamoro territories and indigenous peoples of Mindanao (Lumad), need for religious education for Christian populations in a plural society , the need for life-long dialogue on the ground with the communities of Muslims and Lumads, the need for inter-religious and intra-religious dialogue in Mindanao, the need to use the faculties and facilities of commerce, computing, engineering, scientific and technical and professional to create wealth through trade, the use of trade and business strengthen international dialogue rcultural and civil structures of dialogue and peace, for the promotion of an economy which does not exclude, for the promotion of a culture between cultures which respects and protects the environment, etc.

It is in this context that Fr. Roberto Yap, current President of ADMU (Ateneo de Manila University) and Past President of Xavier University in Cagayan de Oro, writes in the foreword to our book:

“In 2016, the Philippine Province of the Society of Jesus made a conscious decision to focus its apostolic mission, energy and resources in Mindanao. It was an acknowledgment and a response to the sad reality of the region: the persistent poverty of its inhabitants, in particular the Muslim and Lumad communities, the violence and armed conflict that has lasted for decades between the government and the rebel groups, as well as the uncontrolled exploitation and degradation of its natural resources and environment, which are integral to the maintenance of the cultures and lives of its indigenous peoples” (xi).

He further states, “The urgency of addressing Mindanao’s problems cannot be overstated.”

Jose Jowel Canuday, one of the book’s publishers, at the launch. Photo courtesy of IGY CASTRILLO

Indeed, the publishers recognize that thanks to a grant from the CHED (Commission de l’enseignement supérieur), “a conference bringing together a selection of historians, economists, political scientists, psychologists, sociologists, anthropologists and other social scientists was organized at the Ateneo de Davao University to discuss the state of the art in Mindanao Studies on September 12-13, 2018. The study conference forged the idea of ​​producing a reader from Mindanao, with a vision of expanding beyond academia to include practitioners, advocates and other knowledge carriers consonant with the transdisciplinary principle of dissolving the boundaries between conventional academic disciplines and more understanding and real-world concerns.Thanks to Christian Pasion, Kevin Bano, and Frederic Cruz of the Joint Ateneo Institute for Mindanao Economics [JAIME, headed pro bono by Prof. Germelino “Boying” Bautista of the ADMU] to Ateneo de Davao University for graciously hosting the conference. Mildred Estanda and Ritchell Abordo, both authors of this reader, were instrumental on behalf of the Economics Department of the Ateneo de Davao and in collaboration with JAIME to ensure the success of this crucial September 2018 conference.” C It was following the Mindanao Conversations of 2013 that Professor Boying Bautista began his important thematic study of Mindanao’s economy through JAIME.

I will not attempt to present the structure and content of this player. There will be opportunity for this in the presentations of this launch by the editors and a selection of distinguished contributors. Allow me, however, to express my personal satisfaction that among the 41 authors who have contributed to this reader are Ma. Ritchel Abordo, Mildred Estanda, Gail Ilagan, Mansoor Limba, Neil Ryan Pancho, Albert Santos, all of the Ateneo de Davao. Also brother. Karl Gaspar, CSSR, whom we recognize as one of our own thanks to the ongoing partnership between the ADDU Faculty of Theology and the Saint Alphonse Theological and Missionary Institute (SATMI). I am also delighted to find here important contributions to the understanding of Muslim reality in Mindanao by dialogue partners such as Sheikh Mahir Gustahan, Yusuf Roque Morales, Darwin Absari and, of course, our Mansoor Limba.

Allow me, however, to conclude by saying that I know of no other collection of studies which could better situate the serious person wishing to understand, study and engage Mindanao that this one. For a university like ADDU which partially understands its identify to be a Filipino “in the service of Mindanao” and its assignment To engage the Bangsamoro people and the Bangsamoro Autonomous Region of Muslim Mindanao (BARMM) and the indigenous peoples of Mindanao (Lumad), this volume should be required reading for its treatment of the reality of Mindanao, which its editors and authors recognize as complex and resistant to intellectual reflection. systematization. Indeed, it should be a reader that enables scholars, politicians and change agents to engage Mindanao, participate in its “transfiguration” and produce other such readers.

For me, it is also a drive to help Jesuits and their collaborators who have embarked on the road to Mindanao to stay the course no matter the pandemic and changes in the political landscape. The mission in Mindanao must be discerned not in the decisions of superiors 163 years ago or even in the decision seven years ago to send Filipino Jesuits to Mindanao, but in today’s complex realities of religious and cultural diversity, social injustice, historical injustice perpetrated by the state, if not also by the Church, against the Muslim peoples of Mindanao, environmental exploitation and continued alienation of Mindanao vis-à-vis the Mindanaoans who are discussed in this book. Pope Francis’ mission to “go to the peripheries. Go to the poor” remains convincing.

In effect, Transfiguring Mindanao is convincing.

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BBM as Competing Agriculture: Advantages and Disadvantages https://apasl2019manila.org/bbm-as-competing-agriculture-advantages-and-disadvantages/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 16:02:28 +0000 https://apasl2019manila.org/bbm-as-competing-agriculture-advantages-and-disadvantages/ PRESIDENT-elect Ferdinand “Bongbong” R. Marcos Jr. will be the nation’s first president to simultaneously serve as secretary of agriculture. It can have its advantages, but it also has serious disadvantages and even risks. There are three precedents for a president holding a portfolio while in office, but only for the post of defense secretary: Manuel […]]]>

PRESIDENT-elect Ferdinand “Bongbong” R. Marcos Jr. will be the nation’s first president to simultaneously serve as secretary of agriculture. It can have its advantages, but it also has serious disadvantages and even risks.

There are three precedents for a president holding a portfolio while in office, but only for the post of defense secretary: Manuel Quezon (five months in 1941 just before the war); Ferdinand E. Marcos Sr. (one year to January 1967); and Gloria Macapagal Arroyo (for one month in 2003 and two months until February 1, 2007).

In a way, however, BBM is following in the footsteps of his father, who assumed the defense position as soon as he became president on December 31, 1965, only to relinquish it about a year later in January 1967.

While Arroyo twice became Secretary of Defense because she needed time to find the right person for the job, BBM seems to have decided to take on the agriculture job as a governance decision.

“I think the problem in the agricultural sector is serious enough that I have decided to take on the portfolio,” he said the other day. “This will not only clearly show what high priority we place on the agricultural sector, but also, from a practical point of view, to move things forward quickly.”

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Leading the agriculture department, surprisingly, is a position BBM is best qualified for, given its experience in this sector. He is the first Philippine president to have spent most of his political career – 12 years as governor, six as vice-governor and three as representative – in an agricultural province, Ilocos Norte. The province is a microcosm of Philippine agriculture as its dominant crop is rice and maize, with tobacco, a cash crop, as a third product, but rapidly declining in importance due to drastically weakening demand global and local tobacco industry. Reflecting the small farm characteristic of the Philippine agricultural sector, the average size of Ilocos farms is around 1 hectare.

Crucial

The agricultural sector remains crucial in the country, representing 10% of GDP and 25% of employment. What makes it more important than its contribution to the economy is the fact that the majority of poor Filipinos are farmers (32%) and fishermen (26%). Some 24% of Filipinos living in rural areas are poor, in stark contrast to the 9% poor in urban areas.

In this position, he would have a hands-on feel for the Ministry of Agriculture, one of the largest bureaucracies. Little known to most Filipinos, with very little documentation and reporting for these as it is petty corruption, corruption in the department is widespread, with most Filipinos experience in corruption are those involving its agencies. Why are the fertilizer and rice tycoons among the wealthiest, but hidden, tycoons in the country?

BBM, as Secretary of Agriculture, could therefore use his experience there as a model to rid the whole government of corruption and reform it to do its job of delivering services, even lowering the prices of certain products.

However, BBM actually having two jobs has its drawbacks and risks. The presidency of this still third-world nation is a full-time job even in normal times. But we are not in normal times, with skyrocketing gas prices due to the Russian invasion of Ukraine, rising inflation in the United States and Europe being passed on to us almost automatically, and the prospect of a global recession of the magnitude or worse of the economic crisis of 2008-2009.

Macroeconomic

BBM cannot simply leave macroeconomic management to its economics team, as it requires a multi-faceted approach, some of which only it can undertake, such as a call as president to Saudi Arabia not to does not raise the price of the oil it sells to the Philippines. Another example: only BBM can implore big industries, especially distributors of petroleum products, to moderate their greed. Only BBM can sit down with lawmakers to work with them to pass legislation that will help shield the country from the impact of a global economic downturn, like Arroyo did when she asked Congress to enact the P1 trillion economic stimulus law, which was crucial in our country’s resilience to the global crisis of 2008-2009. Another huge job that BBM needs to undertake is to enact legislation that would create a mechanism for stabilizing the prices of petroleum products, like the Petroleum Price Stabilization Fund (OPSF) that his father created.

For the president, taking on the task of leading a department could be like the captain of a passenger plane “simultaneously” taking on the job of flight engineer. As his attention would be divided, both tasks would suffer, with potentially fatal consequences for dozens of air passengers. This is the reason why only three presidents so far in our history have assumed departmental portfolios.

BBM as Agricultural Secretary is easier said than done. BBM alone has exclusive power to sign appointments for 2,000 senior positions (from secretaries to administrators, boards of dozens of government companies) and 3,000 other less senior positions. He can’t be too careful as crooks and even pink saboteurs will flock to Malacañang claiming they want to serve the country. Any new president would need at least six months to figure out what needs to be done and give proper direction to his officials.

Commuting between Department of Agriculture offices on the Elliptical Road in Quezon City and Malacañang, even with escorts, would take at best at least an hour round trip to BBM – very significant executive time would be wasted, unless than he gets in a van where he can have his meetings. Commuting between Malacañang and the department will be a security nightmare that will require a huge security force to secure the avenues and roads he would have to take. If it is the agriculture officials who travel to Malacañang to meet with BBM, they are simply the ones who will lose an execution time, unescorted, of at least three hours.

Why not convince the vice-president, Sara Duterte-Carpio, to be secretary for agriculture instead? Vice-mayor then mayor of Davao City, the urban center of an immense agricultural region, she would have more meaning for the problems of agriculture than for education. As Vice President, BBM can ask Sara to consult with him often regarding her work there.

Facebook: Rigoberto Tiglao

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Bria Homes participates in the 26th NREA-DHSUD Natl Convention https://apasl2019manila.org/bria-homes-participates-in-the-26th-nrea-dhsud-natl-convention/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 04:31:30 +0000 https://apasl2019manila.org/bria-homes-participates-in-the-26th-nrea-dhsud-natl-convention/ Bria Homes offers top-quality, well-designed home models and state-of-the-art equipment. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO BRIA Homes, one of the nation’s leading real estate developers, participated in the 26th National Real Estate Association (NREA) National Convention, a virtual event the alliance co-hosted with the Department of Human Settlements and Urban Development (DHSUD) on June 16 and 17, 2022. […]]]>

Bria Homes offers top-quality, well-designed home models and state-of-the-art equipment. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

BRIA Homes, one of the nation’s leading real estate developers, participated in the 26th National Real Estate Association (NREA) National Convention, a virtual event the alliance co-hosted with the Department of Human Settlements and Urban Development (DHSUD) on June 16 and 17, 2022.

According to MA. Ysolde Flores Prado, NREA General Secretary and General Convention Chairperson, the 26th NREA-DSHUD Online National Convention was part of a series of on-site and online activities that the NREA organized for its members and other industry stakeholders.

Also at this pivotal event were the country’s trusted property developers such as Bria Homes, which as a sponsor and convention partner of the NREA would also be participating in the NREA Trade Shows from 1 to July 3. -pandemic recovery, Bria has continued to seize the opportunity to reach a broad market of aspiring Filipino land-based homeowners, including casual passers-by and passers-by, providing them with viable housing options in more than 50 residential projects nationwide.

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All green | The Manila Times https://apasl2019manila.org/all-green-the-manila-times/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 12:03:11 +0000 https://apasl2019manila.org/all-green-the-manila-times/ Over the past week, much of my attention has been directed to the Asian Clean Energy Forum (ACEF) 2022, an annual conference organized by the Asian Development Bank (AfDB) since 2006, and which is is held this year online, as has become the way of things in our post-Covid world. By the way, I don’t […]]]>

Over the past week, much of my attention has been directed to the Asian Clean Energy Forum (ACEF) 2022, an annual conference organized by the Asian Development Bank (AfDB) since 2006, and which is is held this year online, as has become the way of things in our post-Covid world.

By the way, I don’t like this way of doing it, and I’m sure I don’t need to go into a long explanation about it, because I don’t remember ever hearing anyone say that he preferred having meetings or attending events via Zoom (or Webex, or Microsoft Teams, or whatever your favorite poison) over normal human interactions. I miss things like having to put on shoes and drink shitty conference room cups of coffee, and I think having those things taken away from us makes us poorer, less productive communicators.

Not to mention the rather high emissions cost of video conferencing, which equates to between 150 and 1,000 grams of carbon dioxide per connection per hour, which, in turn, is a rather unpleasant and ironic side effect of a conference on clean energy. But I digress.

This year’s ACEF included more than a dozen sessions spread over four days, covering a variety of topics ranging from technology, finance, policy and regulation, and social concerns. Many of these discussions were interesting and worth revisiting at some point. What seemed to me to be most important to take away, however, was “the big message”, articulated to some extent by AfDB President Masatsugu Asakawa and other prominent speakers, and otherwise functioning as a clear common thread throughout the rest of the sector. – and thematic discussions.

First, there is a sense of urgency to act on the climate that is much more intense than it has been so far. Climate change has always been a pressing concern, but until now it has always been characterized as a problem that must be tackled to avoid bad consequences for the world within a generation or two. Now, the prevailing understanding is that these consequences have already happened and that the worst-case scenarios are not 50 or 100 years in the future, but less than 10 years, and even that might be optimistic.

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Second, because there is an urgent need to make substantial progress quickly – perhaps within three to five years – governments need to radically revamp their policy and regulatory frameworks to accelerate clean energy adoption. This means for the Philippines, for example, that there is no more of that nonsense found in the current “energy plan” which mandates an arbitrary proportion of clean and renewable energy – currently 35% by 2030 and 50% by 2040. Clean energy should be the default choice, and the sole focus of planning from now on.

In addition, other regulatory policies and habits that work against the rapid development of innovative energy solutions need to be corrected. Familiar examples of these are policies aimed at minimizing disruption to the conventional energy sector, such as limits on net metering and distributed energy systems, and the reluctance to allow expansive development of energy markets. energy, and just plain bad habits such as snail speed enforced even the most basic Energy Regulatory Commission (ERC) tasks.

Finally, a discussion that particularly stood out to me was the need for countries to rapidly increase their clean energy research and manufacturing capabilities, not only for the good of the economy, but perhaps even more important for energy security. Of the renewable energy options, for example, solar power is the cheapest, easiest to deploy, and most versatile, but the Philippines has very little capacity to supply its own components. This, in a sense, simply trades one energy vulnerability for another, from reliance on imported fossil fuels to imported solar components. It’s a relatively simple problem to fix – the main ingredients of a solar panel are silicon and copper, two things the Philippines has in more than ample supply – but it will take some serious intention to get it right.

Despite the feeling that we really are on the brink of calamity, a perception that was not so widespread two or three years ago, there are reasons for optimism, even optimism. None of the Philippines’ clean energy challenges or problems are insurmountable, and institutions such as the AfDB, World Bank and other multilateral development banks have made vast financial resources available for the transition. . The biggest problem, and the only one that may not be overcome, is finding the political will and changing destructive preconceptions that energy development should be market-driven and non-disruptive.

***

On a lighter, unrelated note, just to mark Father’s Day with something a little happier, if you thought our sunsets have been particularly colorful over the past few weeks, you’re not mistaken. New research recently published on the explosive eruption of the Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai volcano in January attributes the bright and unusually colorful sunrises and sunsets to the massive amount of hydrogen sulfide blasted into the upper atmosphere by the volcano. , which is now believed to be the largest eruption on Earth since the 1883 Krakatoa explosion in Indonesia.

The effect is more pronounced in the southern hemisphere, but since we are relatively close to the equator, we also benefit from it here. Scientists don’t know how long this will last, as they initially underestimated the size of the eruption; the colorful sky may last a few more weeks, or persist for a few years.

In the interest of full disclosure, I mainly added this news because I like to say “Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai”. My old favorite volcano name was “Popocatepetl” (the one not far from Mexico City), but it has now been removed from the list. In my opinion, for a country with no shortage of volcanoes – one is one too many, as far as I’m concerned – the Philippines really needs to step up the volcano naming department.

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Twitter: @benkritz

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KUWTT: OCTA and DoH differ on Metro risk level | June 17, 2022 https://apasl2019manila.org/kuwtt-octa-and-doh-differ-on-metro-risk-level-june-17-2022/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 16:49:42 +0000 https://apasl2019manila.org/kuwtt-octa-and-doh-differ-on-metro-risk-level-june-17-2022/ Have a good day. Here are the articles from the Manila Times for Friday, June 17, 2022. READ: OCTA, DoH differ on Metro risk level INDEPENDENT Covid-19 tracker OCTA Research has classified the National Capital Region (NCR or Metro Manila) as at moderate risk of Covid infection, although the region has maintained its Level 1 […]]]>

Have a good day. Here are the articles from the Manila Times for Friday, June 17, 2022.

READ: OCTA, DoH differ on Metro risk level

INDEPENDENT Covid-19 tracker OCTA Research has classified the National Capital Region (NCR or Metro Manila) as at moderate risk of Covid infection, although the region has maintained its Level 1 alert status until the end of the month. In an interview on CNN Philippines on Tuesday, OCTA Research lead researcher Dr. Guido David said the group had raised Metro Manila’s risk level to moderate based on the increase in the daily attack rate. average of 0.99, reproduction rate of 1.56 and test positivity rate of 3.3. percent. But in a statement, the Department of Health (DoH) reiterated that the NCR remains at low risk, noting that while the region has shown a positive growth rate over two weeks, its average daily attack rate is still below the six cases required per 100,000 population. .

READ: Giant LED screens installed for BBM grand opening

THE Philippine National Police (PNP) is coordinating with President-elect Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr.’s camp as well as various local government units to install large LED displays for his inauguration on June 30, 2022. Mgen. Valeriano de Leon, director of operations for the PNP, said regional police directors have begun talks with Camp Marcos and LGUs to identify where the screens will be installed. The LED screens will be for people who cannot physically attend Marcos’ inauguration at the National Museum building in Manila, de Leon said. In the case of Vice President-elect Sara Duterte-Carpio’s June 19 inauguration, de Leon said at least six large LED screens will be installed in Davao City. He said the PNP expects a large number of Marcos supporters to attend his swearing-in, but the National Museum can only accommodate 1,200 people. De Leon said he was coordinating with Intramuros Golf Course management outside the museum to see if they could allow people into the course. The golf course can accommodate up to 10,000 people.

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READ: Hospital group backs Herbosa as health chief

The Association of Private Hospitals of the Philippines (PHAPi) on Thursday endorsed emergency medical expert and special consultant to the National Covid-19 Task Force (NTF), Dr. Teodoro Herbosa, as the next secretary to the Health. During a government briefing, PHAPi President Dr. Jose Rene de Grano said their endorsement is in line with endorsements made by the Philippine Medical Association (PMA) and its allied organizations. PMA President Dr. Maria Minerva Calimag and outgoing President Dr. Benito Atienza said in an earlier briefing that Herbosa has “extensive experience and expertise” in health care systems, public health, hospital administration, trauma surgery, emergency and disaster medicine. Herbosa was also endorsed by Go Negosyo founder Jose Maria “Joey” Concepcion 3rd, but he also endorsed infectious disease expert Dr. Edsel Maurice Salvana for the job. Concepcion said having Herbosa or Salvana in the Department of Health (DoH) will help the government keep Covid-19 under control and keep the healthcare system in “good standing”. In return, this would keep the economy running, De Grano hopes President-elect Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr. will accept their endorsement.

BUSINESS: High interest rates in the US will impact PH economy

Heading things up, the current round of interest rate hikes in the US will have a negative impact on economic indicators in the Philippines. International and local analysts told the Manila Times on Thursday after the US Federal Reserve (Fed) raised its federal funds rate target by 75 basis points to 1.50%-1.75%. Wednesday, the biggest increase since 1994, in an effort to cool the economy without triggering a recession. Besides the obvious implications for the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) policy rate hikes, ING Bank Manila senior economist Nicholas Antonio Mapa believes aggressive Fed tightening is likely to translate into a broad-based dollar gain American (USD) in the near future.

SPORTS: esports is knocking on the doors of the UAAP and the NCAA

In sports, the national esports organization of the Philippine Olympic Committee (POC) has expressed optimism that there will come a time when esports will be included in collegiate leagues such as the University Athletic Association of Philippines (UAAP) and the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). Speaking at the Manila Times esports forum on Tuesday, the acting executive director of the Philippine Esports Organization, Marlon Marcelo, noted that he is well aware that some schools, such as De La Salle University, already have clubs. and esports organizations. He said it would all depend on the “insistence” of the UAAP and NCAA that esports can truly become a legitimate sport.

READ: Opinion and Editorial

Stephen CuUnjieng and Ruben Torres are today’s front page columnists. CuUnjieng discusses the ideology and reality of inflation, food prices, and security, while Torres continues to discuss gun laws in the United States.

Today’s editorial discusses the government’s confusing methods of using e-bikes. Read a full version in the opinion section of the newspaper or listen to the voice of the times.

For more news and information, get a copy of The Manila Times on paper, subscribe to his digital edition or log on to www.manilatimes.net. follow us on Twitter, Facebook Where instagram and Track times.

On behalf of the Manila Times, this is Aric John Sy Cua reporting. Have a safe Friday.

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KUWTT: Covid cases increase by 53% in the NCR | June 15, 2022 https://apasl2019manila.org/kuwtt-covid-cases-increase-by-53-in-the-ncr-june-15-2022/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 20:18:19 +0000 https://apasl2019manila.org/kuwtt-covid-cases-increase-by-53-in-the-ncr-june-15-2022/ Have a good day! Here are the top stories from the Manila Times for Wednesday, June 15, 2022. READ: Covid cases rise 53% in NCR Covid-19 cases have risen 53% in the National Capital Region or NCR over the past week, but independent tracker OCTA Research said there was no need to reimpose tougher restrictions […]]]>

Have a good day!

Here are the top stories from the Manila Times for Wednesday, June 15, 2022.

READ: Covid cases rise 53% in NCR

Covid-19 cases have risen 53% in the National Capital Region or NCR over the past week, but independent tracker OCTA Research said there was no need to reimpose tougher restrictions such than locks.

READ: ‘How to murder your husband’ writer jailed for killing spouse

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An American writer, who wrote a tract titled “How Murder Your Husband”, was sentenced to life in prison on Monday (Tuesday in Manila) for shooting dead her husband.

READ: ‘Future of online gaming depends on Marcos admin’

Online gaming or online gambling is still in limbo, but revenue figures show it should be considered a viable source of income, an official from Philippine Amusement and Gaming Corp said on Tuesday.

READ: Robin ready to do his job as a senator

Senator-elect Robin Padilla — who topped the recent May 9, 2022 election, beating out veteran senators, both incumbents and former senators — attended a legislative process briefing on Tuesday, June 14.

READ: Warriors on the brink of the NBA title

Andrew Wiggins scored 26 points as the Golden State Warriors beat the Boston Celtics 104-94 to edge closer to winning a seventh NBA championship crown on Monday (Tuesday in Manila).

READ: Concepcion: No need for higher alert levels

Presidential adviser for entrepreneurship Jose Maria “Joey” Concepcion 3rd said on Tuesday that alert levels should not be raised even if Covid-19 cases increase as long as the country’s hospital capacity rate remains low.

READ: Prepare for tough times ‒ lawmaker

Deputy Speaker of the House and Davao City Third District Representative Isidro Ungab advised Filipinos to be prepared and properly plan how to manage their income and expenses as the country prepares for economic times. hard to come.

READ: Stay clear of Ayungin Shoal, China warned

Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana has warned that not even China can prevent Filipino troops from carrying out resupply missions at Ayungin or Second Thomas Shoal after the Chinese Coast Guard reportedly blocked the entrance to the sandbar recently. submarine in the South China Sea or the Western Philippine Sea.

READ: Flexible working pushed for government employees

Senator Mary Grace Poe has called on the government to introduce work-from-home arrangements for public servants without compromising the delivery of public services amid rising transport costs.

READ: Surveillance order issued against abusive SUV driver

The Philippine National Police is currently coordinating with the Bureau of Immigration to ensure that the SUV driver who was involved in a controversial hit-and-run in the town of Mandaluyong cannot leave the country.

In regional news,

READ: Mayor suspends classes in Casiguran

Following the recent phreatic eruption of the Bulusan Volcano, Casiguran City’s new governor and outgoing mayor, Edwin “Boboy” Hamor, has ordered a suspension of classes in his city.

In world news,

READ: NKorea warned against new nuclear test

South Korea’s top diplomat said on Monday (Tuesday in Manila) that North Korea has completed preparations for another nuclear test and that only a political decision by that country’s top leadership could prevent it from carrying out a nuclear test. go forward.

READ: Zelenskyy to allies: Send more weapons

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky has issued an impassioned plea to Western allies to step up arms deliveries and help stem “terrifying” casualties as Russian forces besiege Sievierodonetsk, destroying the last bridges to the eastern industrial hub.

In the business,

READ: Marcos advised on economics

Economic and political experts gave their recommendations on what President-elect Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr. should prioritize in his first 100 days at a forum hosted by the Institute for Integral Development Studies on Tuesday.

And in sports,

READ: Northport takes on the solo lead

Barely given a second look as title contenders, Northport look to build on their momentum and try to gain some solo leadership when they take on a battered Magnolia Timplados side in the PBA Philippine Cup at the SM Mall of Asia Arena today. June 15 today.

Rigoberto Tiglao and Fr. Ranhilio Aquino are the featured columnists on the front page of The Times.

Tiglao points out that

READ: Local oil company profits make up a big chunk of fuel prices

Pr. Aquino pleads for

READ: Jurisprudence and protection of vulnerable persons

The Times editorial urges

READ: Keep nuclear waste out of WPS

Read all about it.

For more news and information, pick up a copy of the Manila Times in print. Subscribe to our digital edition. Or log on to www.manilatimes.net.

Follow us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram, and “Keep Up With The Times”.

This is the report by Dafort Villaseran. Good day ahead!

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